Centre for Philosophy of Science Applied Evolutionary Epistemology Lab

Michael Arnold

Speciation and Reticulate Evolution: Case Studies of Horizontal Gene Transfer, Hybridization and Viral Recombination

Course Description

The goals of this course are to 1) (re-)introduce the students to some of the canonical literature concerning the process of speciation and 2) discuss the new paradigm represented by the web-of-life metaphor. The second goal will be accomplished by using Mike's book – Evolution Through Genetic Exchange (2006, Oxford University Press) – as a distillation of many studies of natural hybridization, lateral exchange and viral recombination (i.e. Reticulate Evolution).

By the end of the course, I hope that the students will have an increased awareness of both where current studies in speciation/reticulate evolution fit into the history of such investigations and the ongoing shift in the paradigm used to describe the process of evolutionary diversification.

Because the format will be discussion, rather than lecture, the success of this course depends upon student interactions. There is a substantial amount of required reading for this course, so I would suggest strongly that the students begin the assignments before the week of classes. This will facilitate the discussion and add greatly to the value of the course material for the students.


Day-by-Day Program

Lecture 1: Species Concepts

  1. Introduction to course
  2. Chapter XIV from Origin of Species - Darwin, 1859. [7939p*]
  3. Mayr, E. 1942. Systematics and the Origin of Species. Ch.VII. Columbia Univ. Press. New York. [7940p*]
  4. Cracraft, J. 1989. In D. Otte and J.A. Endler, eds. Speciation and its consequences. ppg. 28-59. Sinauer Associates, Inc. Sunderland, Mass. [7941p*]
  5. Templeton, A.R. 1989. In D. Otte and J.A. Endler, eds. Speciation and its consequences. ppg. 3-27. Sinauer Associates, Inc. Sunderland, Mass. [7943p*]

 

Lecture 2: Modes and Tempos of Speciation

  1. Via, S. 2001. TREE 16:381-390. [5915p*]
  2. Soltis, D.E. et al. 2003. New Phytologist 161:173-191. [5372p*]
  3. Schluter, D. 2001. TREE 16:372-380. [5916p*]
  4. Gould, S.J. and N. Eldridge. 1977. Paleobiology 3:115-151. [5917p*]
  5. Meyer, A., T.D. Kocher, P. Basasibwaki and A.C. Wilson. 1990. Nature 347:550-553. [1387p*]
  6. Arnold et al. 2012. Hybridization and Rapid Evolution*

 

Lecture 3: Reticulate Evolution: History, Species Concepts and Hypothesis Testing

  1. Arnold, M.L. 2006. Evolution Through Genetic Exchange. Oxford University Press. Chapters 1-3

 

Lecture 4: Reticulate Evolution: Isolating Barriers, Hybrid Fitness and Gene/Genome Duplication

  1. Arnold, M.L. 2006. Evolution Through Genetic Exchange. Oxford University Press. Chapters 4-6

 

Lecture 5: Reticulate Evolution: Lineage Diversification, Conservation Concerns and Homo sapiens Origins and Ecology

  1. Arnold, M.L. 2006. Evolution Through Genetic Exchange. Oxford University Press. Chapters 7-9
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